#210 Chloe Amy Avery: Embroidery Artist

Chloe Amy Avery is an embroidery artist in London. She uses layers of stitches and many colors to make very realistic pieces. Often, she takes nostalgic items for her subjects, like comfort food or snacks you would get at a fair. Her latest subject is flames, and she uses many colors to depict the fire at the end of a match or a candle.

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Artist Chloe Amy Avery

Chloe Avery

Flame embroidery
Flame embroidery
Chloe Amy Avery
Embroidery by Chloe Amy Avery
Embroidery by Chloe Avery
Embroidery by Chloe Avery
Embroidery by Chloe Avery
Embroidery by Chloe Avery
Embroidery by Chloe Avery
Embroidery by Chloe Avery

Chloe’s website is chloeamyavery.com

She’s also on Instagram @chloe.amy.avery

You can find her Skillshare classes here.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. Trust your instinct as an artist when you are choosing colors and designing your composition. You may be doing something you’ve never seen anyone else do and you need to trust that people want to see that. Also realize that instinct will come the more you practice and develop your art.
  2. Take some time to step away from a piece of art so you don’t get overwhelmed. You’ll want to assess it to see if you’re done or there’s more to do, but you can’t do that if you’re still so close to it.
  3. If you work in collections, meaning do a few pieces with the same subject matter or colors or design together, you’ll get good at it and each one will be better than the last.
  4. When making a new collection, change up your substrate or background for more interest. Chloe makes some collections on white canvas, and her flames are done on black fabric.
  5. A great way to challenge yourself with your art making is to occasionally switch the scale of your art. If you normally make quite large pieces, challenge yourself to make a series of small pieces, and vice versa.
  6. You make like offering commissions to your customers because you get to hear what they’d like to see.
  7. I know we’ve talked about this before, but you need to make sure you are posting great quality photos of your artwork. Of course, you want the photos to accurately represent what you’ve made, but you also want people to be able to zoom in on your photos so they can see a good detail of your art.

#209 Lara Cornell: Author and Mentor

Artist Lara Cornell lives in Minneapolis with her family. Her career has been built around her love of travel and meeting artisans all over the world. She hosted retreats in Europe, and she had a collaborative art space near her home. Like many, her travel abruptly ended, and she closed her brick-and-mortar space. Instead, Lara took time to educate herself on business skills and how creatives can improve their marketing, branding, and focus. She ultimately wrote a book, and it recently launched and has already become a best-seller. We talk about her book and how she can help other creatives. If you’d like to listen to my previous episode with Lara, it is Episode 136. 

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Lara Cornell

Lara Cornell

Maker's Mark book
Maker's Mark book
Lara Cornell artwork
Artwork by Lara Cornell
Lara Cornell artwork

Lara’s website is laracornell.com

You can also find her on Instagram @laracornellart.

You can email her at lara@laracornell.com to receive a copy of her book.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. Don’t assume that because you are a creative person you can’t manage the business side of things. That’s a wrong assumption. In fact, artists often tackle their business issues in a very creative and effective way.
  2. One way to learn some business skills is to take online classes, for example, in social media or marketing.
  3. If you want your artwork to be your legacy and be around for many decades, you need to make decisions about the durability of your materials and techniques.
  4. Prints don’t have to be a very low-priced item in your portfolio. You can elevate your print by increasing the quality of the paper, embellishing the print afterwards, and limiting the number of prints available.
  5. When you’ve decided what your legacy brand is, then make sure that all aspects of your business go with that legacy brand. For example, if you want your product to be made with all reused materials, then extend that to your packaging as well.
  6. In Lara’s book, she suggests you create a Legacy Blueprint for your business. This is a living document that plots out how you will run your business so that you will have a legacy brand and you will be successful. Their core values and who they want to serve won’t change over time but the details will.
  7. Make sure you are creating a business that aligns with your values. It’s never a good idea to make something just because you think it will sell. You want to make something because it feels good and you want to keep doing it.
Lara Cornell

#208 Hannah Fitzgibbon: Creativity Coach

Hannah Fitzgibbon is a creativity coach on the South Island of New Zealand. Hannah helps artists have more intention and control over their creative process. She coaches people to develop strategies to get past creative blocks, to be better at time management, and to invite innovation into their business. Through her coaching practice she can help you develop and trust your creativity to find more joy and flow in work you love.

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Hannah Fitzgibbon

Hannah Fitzgibbon

Hannah Fitzgibbon
Hannah Fitzgibbon art
Hannah Fitzgibbon
Hannah Fitzgibbon
Hannah Fitzgibbon
Hannah Fitzgibbon art

Hannah’s website is creativityreflector.com

She is on Instagram at hanfitz.creates

Her podcast is called Creativity Reflections.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. When Hannah is helping people with their creativity, she suggests they first create an atmosphere or space where you can really relax, so that you can lean into the skills you already have. This will give you confidence that you can learn new things.
  2. We talked about the uncertainty that many business owners have been facing this past year. The first thing she mentioned is that you need to understand that your fear and paralysis are completely valid.
  3. The next thing you can work on is bringing your stress level down. She suggests doing that through movement rather than trying to think your way through it. A walk is a great thing to do for destressing.
  4. One of the key things when working on a problem is to stop and reflect about what you’ve done so far. You need to give yourself time to evaluate what is working and what is not.
  5. We can create the conditions to invite inspiration more often by reflecting on what has worked in the past.
  6. When doing a new project, you want to research and learn new steps to take. However, don’t get sucked into over learning that it then becomes procrastination.
  7. You also don’t want to be overly responsible, where you don’t allow others to help you with the work.
  8. For time management, often what helps is getting yourself moving in the right direction but not trying to get something perfect. She also noted that it’s not really about managing time, it’s about managing your energy and prioritizing what you need to do. When you do a task when you have the right energy, it may only take one hour to do, rather than three hours when you aren’t energized.

#207 Carolyn Peeler: Prone to Wander Artistic and Cultural Retreats

Carolyn Peeler of Vancouver, Canada created her company Prone to Wander Retreats to offer art and culture retreats in various countries. Her retreats include cooking classes from local artisans and tours of the area. She also invites an artist to travel with them to teach their art medium, like watercolor or photography. Her plan is to offer retreats again in 2022, in Italy and Morocco. 

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Carolyn Peeler

Carolyn Peeler

Carolyn Peeler creative retreat
Carolyn Peeler creative retreat
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Prone to Wander Retreats
Carolyn Peeler

Carolyn’s website is pronetowanderretreats.com

She can also be found on Instagram and Facebook.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. Retreats are great opportunities to learn about another country and their food, art, and culture. It’s also a wonderful gift to you to get away from your daily life and meet new people in a new setting.
  2. If you feel stagnant in your art, it may help to switch it up and work on another completely different type of art, like taking a break from your painting to make some jewelry. You may find that when you get back to your painting you are newly inspired and your creativity is refreshed.
  3. It’s a good idea to feature different tours and classes at each retreat to encourage repeat attendees.
  4. When Carolyn planned her first retreat, she planned it with another person so she wouldn’t be doing it alone. That’s a great way to get started with retreats and share the work involved.
  5. For planning a retreat, you need to balance the needs of your clients with the contracts you may have signed for venues. With this pandemic, looking forward, you’ll also have to look at the rules in the country you’re going to plus the rules of all the countries of your clients.
  6. As a retreat host, it’s best if you include all the travel between locations, most of the meals, and all the classes and excursions in one fee for your retreat. Usually, the only extra thing that your client has to buy is the plane ticket to and from the location.
  7. Carolyn pointed out one other thing that is specific to some countries. If you’re providing transportation within the country, you may have to be a registered travel agent in the country. She was able to use a local agent to make those arrangements for her retreat.
  8. When planning additional retreats, make sure you don’t plan so many that they outpace your demand. Carolyn is growing her business at a slow even pace for this reason.
  9. It’s a good idea to set up a Facebook group for your retreat guests so they can “pre-meet” each other before they arrive and they can ask any questions about the retreat.
  10. Carolyn pointed out that going on a retreat is so valuable to your creative growth. You’re meeting other creatives, doing new things, and stepping out of your comfort level when you travel to another country.
  11. If you’re interested in going on a retreat in the future, please reach out to retreat companies now and tell them you’re interested and would like to be put on their waiting list. That will be so encouraging to them to know that you’re looking forward to when they can offer retreats again.
Prone to Wander Retreats

#206 Andrea Ehrhardt: Mural and Lettering Artist

Andrea Ehrhardt is a mural and lettering artist. She got her start painting for Bass Pro Shops, learning from other muralists and developing her skills. After two years traveling to different locations, painting and lettering at each new store opening, she started her own art business creating murals in her hometown of Springfield, Missouri. After many mural and lettering projects later, she now advises other artists through her membership community called The Artist Academy.

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Andrea Ehrhardt with painting

Andrea Ehrhardt

Andrea Ehrhardt mural
Andrea Ehrhardt mural in Springfield, Missouri
Be a Kind Human mural
Andrea Ehrhardt mural
Andrea Ehrhardt mural
Andrea Ehrhardt mural
Mural by Andrea Ehrhardt
Andrea's first mural in Springfield.

Andrea’s website is artbyandreae.com

She can also be found on Instagram @artbyandreaehrhardt

Her Artist Academy membership community, where you can find all kinds of help for your art business, is here on her website.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. Andrea gave a couple examples where she asked for something related to her business and she got it. Don’t be afraid to ask. Nothing is lost by asking, and if the answer is No, then you move on or figure something else out.
  2. If you want to learn a new technique, like mural art, approach other mural artists and see if they will mentor you. Offer to pay them for an hour of questions, or offer to assist for them for free. Take advantage of the knowledge and experience of other artists, but be sure you give them something else in return.
  3. A great idea when you make some street art is to create a hashtag for it so people can post their own photos with your art. Be sure and put your Instagram page and the hashtag at the bottom of the art.
  4. Public art is a great way for tons of people to see what you do. Andrea did her first mural, some butterfly wings in Springfield, Missouri, for free for a friend who owned the building. After that, it was free advertising, and she could use that to pitch her street art to other businesses in the area.
  5. When you’re proposing a unique project to someone, they’ll be more likely to go for it if you really educate them on what it’s all about and what it can do for them. Andrea told businesses that her murals would attract people to the business and people would tag them so even more people would come.
  6. For her murals, Andrea swears by Benjamin Moore latex paint because it’s thick and gives good coverage. She just uses interior or exterior accordingly. She also uses Nova paint because they have a bigger variety of colors.
  7. Andrea offers a membership community called the Artist Academy. Communities are a great way to learn new things because you get the expertise of the leader, plus she brings in experts in other areas to speak to the group, plus group members help each other out with things that they know. Another thing to know about membership communities is that you can join any time, but you’ll usually have access to any resources that were created before you joined. You can always go back and see previous videos and tutorials.
  8. Have you heard of a three-tiered pricing structure? Andrea utilizes this for her art business. You want to offer artwork in three different price ranges so that your art is accessible to everyone, both individuals and businesses. Her murals are her highest tier, then her fine art and prints, and finally, her print of the month club, which is only $7 per print.
  9. Andrea pointed out that it’s a great time to be an artist. It’s so easy to find followers from all over the world, and it’s easy to make videos to show people what you do. If you can’t figure out Instagram, or anything else you’d like to try, you can find lots of how-to videos, or look and see if your favorite artist offers instructional videos.
  10. Videos are a great way to show people what you do. The newest way is by making short reels on Instagram. The time-lapse function on your phone works well because a long video showing your process can be condensed to 15 or 30 seconds.
  11. When you’re making videos, it takes up a lot of your battery. If you put it on airplane mode, that won’t take up as much charge. This is a genius hack that I hadn’t thought of. I’m definitely trying that.
  12. When doing public art, check to see if the city has rules about what can be painted and how. You don’t want to get in a situation where you need to re-do a mural at your own expense.
Andrea Ehrhardt artist
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