#181 Jeanne Oliver: Art and Business Online Workshops
Jeanne Oliver

#181 Jeanne Oliver: Art and Business Online Workshops

Jeanne Oliver is a teaching artist based in Colorado. She offers hundreds of art, business, and lifestyle workshops on her website. Some classes are by her, and some are by over 75 other artists. She advises them on how to film and edit their classes, but to also make it in their personal style. She’s found that online classes are doing very well right now, because people are wanting to get an escape and take a fun art class in the comfort of their home. With all that she does, she’s found a way to integrate her loves of art, travel, home, and family.

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play Music, CastBox, or Stitcher.

photo of Jeanne Oliver who teaches art workshops

Jeanne Oliver

Where You Can Find Jeanne Oliver

This is Jeanne’s website: jeanneoliver.com

Instagram: @jeanneoliver

Click on this link to go to her Facebook community: Jeanne Oliver Creative Community

To search for courses on her website click here.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. Don’t limit yourself to one kind of art or one thing in your business. If art and homemaking and fashion appeal to you, then include all of those in your business offerings.
  2. If you offer online classes, and your students are asking for another specific class that isn’t necessarily in your expertise, then consider inviting other artists to host classes on your website with a class that your students want.
  3. When you want to work with other artists, start out with asking your friends first. You already have a relationship, and they’ll definitely want to see you succeed.
  4. When offering an online class, it’s a good idea to offer to your students a period of time when they can interact with the instructor. It can just be for a month, and after that the students can work at their own pace. If you offer the class a second time, like maybe a year from now, you can decide then if you want to offer access to the instructor or make it entirely self-paced.
  5. Many artists offer their classes as life-time access now. That means the student can go back and look at the class any time after they’ve purchased it.
  6. Jeanne offers the classes on her website individually, meaning you just pay for whatever class you’d like to take. Other websites offer a membership to their site and you get access to all of the classes. You’ll have to look at the merits of each if you want to set up online classes.
  7. I’ve said this before about online classes: It’s a great idea to offer a Facebook group to go with your class so that the students can interact with you, but also so they can interact with each other and share what they’ve made in the class.
  8. Jeanne offers some free classes on her website for many reasons. One is that she knows that people want to see what you’re like and what your quality is like. You can also show people what you’re like during Facebook Live sessions.
  9. When deciding how to do your first class, of course you can look at others for ideas on how to film it. But make sure you keep it your own style: If you paint on a table rather than an easel, then do your class that way. If you’re more comfortable with the camera on your hands rather than your face, then film it that way.
  10. When launching your first course, ask your artist friends to tell people about it too. Take advantage of the goodwill that you have with each other from previous collaborations and ask them to help you with your launch.
  11. Collaborations with other artists can help to bring energy and passion back into your business. A collaboration could be working with someone to do a portion of your business that you’re not skilled in, or that you just don’t want to do, like video editing or taking photos of your art.
  12. Jeanne mentioned that she tries to share on her social media more than just what’s for sale. She wants to show them more about herself and her home and her life, so that they are interested in her, and later they’ll get interested in what she sells.
  13. Jeanne was able to do a small in person workshop recently with some key changes. She had less participants, they were spread out and stayed in their own spaces, and she sanitized all the areas.
#180 Sheila Arora: Intuitive Abstract Painter
Sheila Arora intuitive abstract painter

#180 Sheila Arora: Intuitive Abstract Painter

Sheila Arora is an intuitive abstract painter from the Chicago area. She does a beautiful job of explaining her process, including how she chooses colors and how she develops her composition. A true Left Brain/Right Brain creative, she has worked for years in the area of finance, all while painting and developing her abstract style. She has shown her work in a Chicago gallery, and has shared her art with her thousands of Instagram followers. We also talk about studio space, the materials she uses, and the different substrates she uses to paint each of her collections.

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play Music, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Sheila Arora intuitive abstract painter

Sheila Arora

This is Sheila’s website: skarora.com

Instagram: @sheilarora

Facebook: Sheila Arora

You can go to Blick Art Materials page on Facebook to find her October 1st, 4:00 CT Event: Facebook takeover Live painting.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. Don’t limit yourself to certain colors if many speak to you. You can always do different series for your different color palettes.
  2. Mark making is a way to add more interesting elements to your paintings. It can be done with many different tools and materials.
  3. Art journals are a great way to try out new techniques, color combinations, and designs. They’re not as big a commitment as it would be when painting on a canvas. They’re also a great way to tap into your feelings because you’re free to do whatever you want in it.
  4. Art journals can be any size you want. Sheila has been using one that is a spiral-bound pad of 14” x 17” paper. Try out a few of them to see just what type you’d like.
  5. Sheila also paints on really large papers, currently 4’x5’. She’s found an easy way to paint on paper that large is to thumbtack it to the wall.
  6. She also noted that you don’t have to have a perfect studio or tons of supplies to make art. She just needs a little space, and even if she just had only a couple of colors, she could still make art.
  7. Sheila has found she gets a lot of Instagram engagement when she does Instagram Lives. You can also easily add music to your videos to make it more interesting.
  8. She also utilizes something new in Instagram called Instagram Reels. That just launched in August. It’s a way to create fun multi-clip videos with audio and effects. If you can’t find it by clicking on the camera in Instagram, it may be that it hasn’t been rolled out to your account yet. Make sure you have an updated version of Instagram, and eventually it will come to you.
  9. It’s a good idea to paint collections, so you have similar works that can be displayed together. Sheila makes about 30 paintings for each collection, and they will be on the same substrate and similar size.
  10. Sheila believes that if you lean into your intuition when making art, you’re able to get past overthinking a piece and you get into the feeling of a piece. Again, this is something that will come to you the more you practice and make more art.
  11. Sheila knows a painting is done when the composition looks complete and the colors are balanced. This may not seem like a specific answer, but it makes sense to me. You’re doing the painting, and you will know when it feels done to you.
  12. A new material Sheila has been using is Liquitex Acrylic Inks. They can give a thin translucent layer on top of your acrylic paints, and can be dropped or brushed on. You can also mix them into your other paints to create a new tint.

#179 Jen Jovan: Mixed Media Artist and Malarkey Maven

Artist Lindsay Ostrom started her art career as a retail shop owner who specialized in craft supplies like paper and rubber stamps. As the art trends changed, so did she, and she evolved into a scrapbooker and a lettering artist. Just since the pandemic began, she has brought her artwork to a large Facebook community, and she creates art with them every morning. She’s published many books and has quite a few online lettering art classes.  

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play Music, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Jen Jovan

This is Jen’s website: jenjovan.com

Instagram: @jenjovanwalls

Facebook: Jen Jovan Walls

You can also find Jen’s artwork on artfinder.com and prints on Fine Art America.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. Art journaling is a great way to get into art. You can be messy and work on small pages, and if you don’t like it, you can move onto another page.
  2. Jen takes new classes about every quarter so that she is always learning and developing her style.
  3. When Jen first got her art into a gallery, she showed them that she was willing to work hard and help in the gallery to earn her spot there. Helping at the gallery is also good because you can learn new skills, like how to place art around the room and how to hang it.
  4. Jen has done an artist residency at a gallery in Ireland two different times. She’s found that galleries in other countries will offer residencies with a place to stay in exchange for helping at the gallery. That’s a great way to do some world traveling, that is, when we can start traveling again.
  5. We talked about the importance of putting a title on your art. Jen feels that if the title is quirky, or emotional, or deep, it will grab someone’s interest and they will want to see more.
  6. Jen feels it’s very important to be brave in your art. Do what you like to do and put it out there, even if it’s not the best. She will show everything she does because the more she puts out there the braver she gets. She’s also letting others know that it’s ok to be vulnerable and brave.
  7. Just like brick and mortar galleries, online galleries each have a distinct style and culture. You may have to try out a few to see which one works best with your art.
  8. We are doing so many things distantly now, it’s a great time to contact another artist and propose a collaboration. Jen has done that with some authors, and she has provided illustrations for their books.
  9. When collaborating with someone, it’s important to lay out the plan of who does what and how you will split the sales. You also need to make sure you are all marketing the product in the same way, so there is one voice.
  10. Jen has put about 90% of her art in online sales. That saves her on the hustle of doing markets and shows. She’s also switched from galleries to smaller boutique locations. That gives her a larger split of the sales so it has increased her income.
  11. We also talked about how important it is to take good photos of every piece of art. Even if you sell the original, you can sell prints at a lower price.
  12. Jen paints figures, and creatures, as well as abstracts. There’s no reason to limit yourself to one style, if that’s what you want to create, because you will find buyers for all.

#178 Celebrating this Podcast

Today I’m doing a special episode to celebrate this podcast. After 2 years, 3 months, and 177 episodes, I have reached 150,000 downloads! This episode will give you a small history of my show, and I’ve included clips of some of the best art business tips. I’ve also included some behind the scenes clips and bloopers. I’ll be back to artist interviews on my next episode next Wednesday.  

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play Music, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Suzanne Redmond

Thanks so much for listening to my podcast!

You can follow me on Instagram @suzanneredmondart or @theleftbrainartist

And on Facebook Suzanne Redmond Art.

#177 Lindsay Ostrom: Lettering Artist

Artist Lindsay Ostrom started her art career as a retail shop owner who specialized in craft supplies like paper and rubber stamps. As the art trends changed, so did she, and she evolved into a scrapbooker and a lettering artist. Just since the pandemic began, she has brought her artwork to a large Facebook community, and she creates art with them every morning. She’s published many books and has quite a few online lettering art classes.  

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play Music, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Lindsay Ostrom

This is Lindsay’s website: Lindsay Ostrom — Creator of Cuteness.

And her blog: lindsayostrom.blogspot.com

This is her Etsy shop: the paper rabbit….Lindsay Ostrom. creator of by ThePaperRabbit

Instagram: @lindsayannostrom

You may also join her Facebook group, where she hosts daily art making get togethers, Creative Hand Lettering with Lindsay

And this is her Facebook page, Lindsay Waltman-Ostrom.

Lindsay was recently a guest instructor on Tracy Weinzapfel’s 12-hour Art Party. You can find out when Tracy is hosting that again by going to her website yourartfuljourney.com or her Facebook page Art Journaling with Tracy Weinzapfel.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. I think Lindsay is a prime example of “If you build it, they will come.” When the world first went on lockdown due to Covid-19, she went on her Lettering Facebook page, and just started doing art, every morning. Soon others joined her to see what she was doing. She has been showing up every day ever since, and so have a lot of other people who want to make art with her or just watch her make art. Consistency is key in this case, to growing an audience.
  2. For Lindsay, it’s important to have your own hand lettering in your art. It doesn’t need to be perfect, but it means so much more when it is your own.
  3. She suggests that you do a little bit of hand lettering every day and you will get better at it.
  4. For her classes, she teaches techniques but also provides sheets to download for practicing.
  5. Lindsay offers classes on Facebook that are done Live or later if you didn’t get to it Live. She also offers classes on her Etsy shop that you can do any time.
  6. Lindsay told us about a Facebook feature called Units and Files. These are great to use if you are offering a series of lessons within a class. The group of lessons can be called a Unit. Then people don’t have to search through your page for a certain lesson, they can just look up the Unit and see which Files are in that Unit.
  7. She has also taught through other artist’s sites. That’s a great way to get your name out to a whole new audience, because all of the hosts followers could potentially follow you now that they’ve heard of you through a class you’ve taught on their site.
  8. Lindsay has used a licensing agent before to get her artwork on products. She advises you to make sure that the licensing is working for you and not themselves and that you will actually make money from the arrangement.
  9. It worked better for Lindsay to just call the company owner directly and state what it was she wanted to do with them.
  10. The most important thing to do is align yourself with a company that has the same values as you.
  11. If you have been blogging for many years, there’s no reason to get rid of it if you now have a website. Just link it to your website so people can see all that great content you’ve posted over the years.
Close Menu