#195 Season 2 Episode Recommendations

For this end of year episode, I recommend 10 episodes from Season 2. These episodes include an illustrator and author; a painter with a unique colorful style; an expert collaborator; a glass artist and CPA who can help you with the year-end accounting issues for your business; an expert in handmade businesses; a creator of art classes; an artist who sketches the everyday and teaches classes; an oil painter; a mixed media artist who uses vintage papers; and an artist who paints abstract landscapes inspired by where she lives.  

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Season 2 Left Brain Artist podcast recommendations

Recommended Episodes

Lisa Congdon
Lisa Congdon
Melissa Doty
Melissa Doty
Sandi Keene
Sandi Keene
Hope Barron
Hope Barron
Deborah Engelmajer
Deborah Engelmajer
Kasia Avery
Kasia Avery
Danny Gregory
Danny Gregory
Katrina Berg
Katrina Berg
Jenny Brown
Jenny Brown
Doulene Walker
Doulene Walker

#194 Season 1 Episode Recommendations

For this special holiday episode, I recommend 10 episodes from Season 1. These episodes include an artist who creates art every day; an art show curator; an art gallery owner; an artist and podcast host; a tech-savvy artist; painters, mixed media artists, and instructors. 

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

The Left Brain Artist podcast Episode 194

Recommended Episodes

artist Jennifer Love Gironda
Jennifer Love Gironda -- Episode 5
artist Nicole Galluccio
Nicole Galluccio -- Episode 7
artist Roxanne Evans Stout
Roxanne Evans Stout -- Episode 19
artist Trina Slade-Burks
Trina Slade-Burks -- Episode 29
artist Roben-Marie Smith
Roben-Marie Smith -- Episode 37
artist Ardith Goodwin
Ardith Goodwin -- Episode 51
artist Laura Horn
Laura Horn -- Episode 57
artist AJ Brockman
AJ Brockman -- Episode 71
artist Mary Price
Mary Price -- Episode 87
artist Sara Schroeder
Sara Schroeder -- Episode 97

#193 Maria Tritico: Remembering a Talented Artist and Beautiful Person

Maria Tritico was a jewelry artist, art therapist, and art educator here in Palm Beach County where I live. I’m replaying my episode with her from October, 2018 with a new introduction. Last week, Maria died when she was hit by stray gunfire while she was sitting on the beach. She was a friend of mine, as she was to just about everyone in the Palm Beach County art community. Maria had just turned 32, had just closed on a house with her fiancé, and had plans to get married this December 31st. I would like my listeners to know that there was an amazing, beautiful, and talented artist named Maria Tritico. She was loved, and she spread her love to so many groups of people that she worked with. In this interview, we talk about her jewelry making and how her style has developed over the years. We also talk about her art therapy degree and how she was starting an art therapy program at the Lighthouse Art Center in Tequesta, Florida. When we talked, Maria was teaching jewelry classes at the Lighthouse. Since then, she became the Director of Education. The staff of the Lighthouse Art Center are like one big family, and losing Maria is a big loss for them. It’s also a loss for our local art community, as well as the groups Maria helped with her art therapy.

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Maria Tritico in front of Jupiter Lighthouse

Maria Tritico

Hair collar by Maria Tritico
Hair Collar by Maria Tritico
Birds Brooch by Maria Tritico
Birds Brooch
Silver necklace by Maria Tritico
Brooch by Maria Tritico
Moonscraper brooch
Brooch by Maria Tritico
Cable Bridge brooch
Bracelet by Maria Tritico
Aqueduct bracelet
Maria Tritico
Maria won Best in Show at Continuum Gallery for one of her skyscraper necklaces.
Chad Steve and Maria Tritico
Maria with her fiance Chad Steve
Silver necklace by Maria Tritico
Skyscraper necklace

You can see more of Maria’s jewelry on her website.

If you would like to make a donation to the Maria Tritico Memorial Fund through the Lighthouse ArtCenter, here is the link.

Maria Tritico
#192 Rebecca Sower: Mixed Media Artist Inspired by the Outdoors
Rebecca Sower

#192 Rebecca Sower: Mixed Media Artist Inspired by the Outdoors

Rebecca Sower is a mixed media artist from the Nashville, Tennessee area. She started painting and drawing seriously about five years ago. Her paintings incorporate monoprints, collaged papers, and drawings. Recently her collaged pieces have included drawings of birds. She is inspired by what she sees on her walks in the farmlands near her home. Rebecca has taught classes in person and she offers two online classes through Jeanne Oliver’s website.

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Artist Rebecca Sower

Rebecca Sower

Mixed media art by Rebecca Sower
Mixed media art by Rebecca Sower
Art by Rebecca Sower
Her wall of collage papers.
Art by Rebecca Sower
Art by Rebecca Sower
Collages by Rebecca Sower
Art by Rebecca Sower
Art by Rebecca Sower
Art by Rebecca Sower
Rebecca Sower teaching

Rebecca’s website is called Rebecca Sower Art

You can find her online classes at Jeanne Oliver’s website here.

You can also find her on Instagram

and on Etsy

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. Rebecca said she has a business degree and that’s been very helpful with her art business. That’s a very good point. It’s a great idea if you can take an accounting or marketing class to help with your business.
  2. Drawing is a skill. When Rebecca wanted to get better at that, she practiced a lot, over an hour a day for a couple years. That’s the only way you will get better at it.
  3. Another great thing that Rebecca pointed out is, you’re going to make some bad art, especially when you’re learning. There’s no reason why you can’t paint over a canvas and start over.
  4. Painting on paper is less expensive than painting on canvas, especially when you’re first learning. But if you paint one you really like, you can just use gel medium to adhere the paper to a wood cradle board.
  5. When painting on paper, if you get it too wet, it will wrinkle when dry. You can flatten it back out by spritzing water on the back, and then putting it under books to dry.
  6. Rebecca pre-paints papers to use for her collages. She uses deli paper, which she can buy cheaply at restaurant supply stores.
  7. Rebecca makes art that is inspired by her walks near her home. She reminds you to remember not just what you saw, but also what you felt during that walk. It’s important to include the feels in your art as well.
  8. When she does take photos during her walks, she will convert the photos to black and white. That will help her find the values and their contrast. It also allows her to paint in the colors that she felt rather than the colors that she saw.
#191 Liz Constable: A Book Artist Who Writes
Liz Constable

#191 Liz Constable: A Book Artist Who Writes

Liz Constable is a book artist from Auckland, New Zealand. Liz creates under the name Book Art Studios, in a studio near her home. She is self-taught, but she makes beautiful hand-stitched books that she fills with words and stories. She sometimes even dyes the paper that she uses, and she teaches that technique and others through her Zoom classes and in person camps. She’s published four books, most recently Re: Create, which she self-published with her sister and a photographer.

Listen here or download from iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, CastBox, or Stitcher.

Book Artist Liz Constable

Liz Constable

Book by Liz Constable
Hibernation Set 1
Dyed paper by Liz Constable
Dyed Paper
Handmade books by Liz Constable
Hibernation Handmade Books
ReCreate book by Liz Constable
ReCreate book
ReCreate book by Liz Constable
ReCreate book back cover
One Small Drop book by Liz Constable
One Small Drop book
Dyed paper by Liz Constable
Curly dyed paper

Liz’s website is called Book Art Studios.

You can purchase her published books on her website here.

On Instagram, she is @bookartstudios.

Here are some great takeaways from our conversation:

  1. I’m sure you’ve heard us say, that you need to practice and practice again to get better with your art. Well, one thing that Liz points out is that you need to practice so you’ll learn how materials work together. That’s a very good point. You may learn to do something one way with certain materials, but you may find out later that other materials work better for you.
  2. When Liz first started making books, she made do with whatever tools she had on hand. Remember that you don’t always need the fanciest expensive tools. She didn’t have a cutting mat but made do with her kitchen cutting board. You don’t have to spend a lot of money to get started with most types of art.
  3. When exhibiting your work at a fair or trade show, make your booth stand out from the others. You’ll be remembered if your booth doesn’t look like all the other booths.
  4. If you want to go to a trade show, do your research first so you know what to expect. You also should have clear goals for being there, but you should also be flexible on what might happen.
  5. When doing a class or a how-to book, make sure you don’t use tools that a beginner might not be able to find. Think of an alternative you can use instead from something most people would have in their homes. This is a great suggestion particularly now since most people are having long periods of time staying near their homes and shopping isn’t as easy.
  6. Liz packages her book purchases beautifully, and includes little surprises for her buyers. She has enhanced the purchasing experience so much that the likelihood of repeat customers is great.
  7. If you’ve written a how-to style book, it’s a great idea to create classes around some of the projects in the book.
  8. Liz is having success teaching classes online through Zoom. That’s a great inexpensive way to offer a class, and you can reach students from all over the world.
  9. She also offers classes through Zoom at different times, so people can choose a class that suits their time zone.
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