#8 Evaluating Your Year and Making New Goals

On the Left Brain Artist podcast, I will bring you weekly interviews with artists who are actively creating art and actively selling their art. Of course, I’ve chosen these artists because of the quality of their artwork. But I’ve also chosen them because they have experience showing their work in galleries, stores, festivals, and they have stories to share that can help other artists who want to sell their work. Each week I will bring you an interview with one of these artists. Later in the week, I’ll take one thing we discussed that I think it’s important to expand upon – one thing that they’ve done to increase their business. They’ve had success doing this one thing, and I want to share that success with you.

Listen here or download from any podcast app.

When I spoke with artist Nicole Galluccio, she talked about how she ends each year. She sits down and makes a list of everything she did that year, then she thinks about what she’d like to accomplish in the coming year. Here are my thoughts on how and why you should do this:

Include these items in the summary of your year:

  1. Total sales and to whom
  2. Sales by what source
  3. Total classes taught and number of students
  4. Other sources of income
  5. All your exhibitions
  6. Any installations or public art
  7. Articles you were in/articles you wrote
  8. Any interviews
  9. Residencies
  10. Grants
  11. Artist organizations joined

You also need to list what didn’t work. Then you need to analyze your administrative tasks, and see if you can streamline them or hire someone to do them for you. 

For your goal-making, think of something related to your business that you’ve always wanted to do and that will challenge you.

Don’t neglect this important aspect of your business. Your business will grow, and it will always stay exciting for you if you try new things.

#7 Nicole Galluccio: Acrylic Painter with a Bold Colorful Style

Nicole Galluccio entered college to study biochemistry, with the hope of becoming a doctor. Despite being awarded a scholarship for chemistry, her teacher thought her medical illustration skills were so exceptional that she should pursue art. She ultimately received a Bachelor’s in Fine Art, and is now a professional artist. She has developed a unique style of acrylic paintings using dozens of bold colors with a pop art feel, and she pursues every art opportunity that comes her way.

Listen here or download from any podcast app.

Here is Nicole Galluccio at the opening of her show where she painted fifty album covers.

A painting in her Mandala series.
A painting in her Mandala series.
A painting in her Mandala series.
Nicole painted this bay door at the studios of the Boynton Beach Arts District.

I hope you enjoyed listening to Nicole Galluccio. Here is where you can find her:

Facebook

Instagram

Here are my takeaways from this episode:

  1. Look for Calls to Artists so that you can apply to shows at galleries, museums, or shops.
  2. Seek out live painting opportunities. You will get practice public speaking, gain confidence, and receive feedback from the public.
  3. Paint every day; you will get more efficient and get to know your products better.
  4. Make your own opportunities by meeting other artists and visiting galleries to see what is out there.
  5. Say yes to everything, even if it’s outside of your comfort level.
  6. At the end of the year, update your resume and list out what you did last year.
  7. Then take a moment to make goals for the coming year: What art project have you been dying to do? What is something that will challenge you?

In my mini business episode that I’ll be posting on Friday, I’ll be talking more about how to update your resume and CV and make plans for the coming year. Be sure to give that a listen.

#6 How to Establish an Art Practice

On the Left Brain Artist podcast, I will bring you weekly interviews with artists who are actively creating art and actively selling their art. Of course, I’ve chosen these artists because of the quality of their artwork. But I’ve also chosen them because they have experience showing their work in galleries, stores, festivals, and they have stories to share that can help other artists who want to sell their work. Each week I will bring you an interview with one of these artists. Later in the week, I’ll take one thing we discussed that I think it’s important to expand upon – one thing that they’ve done to increase their business. They’ve had success doing this one thing, and I want to share that success with you.

Listen here or download any podcast app.

When I spoke with artist Jennifer Love Gironda, she talked about how she creates an art piece a day. Here are my thoughts on why you should establish a practice of creating art every day and how you can do it:

  1. It will improve your skills and challenges you to try something new.
  2. It helps you to develop your style.
  3. It gives you accountability.
  4. Joining an art group gives you outside accountability, encouragement, feedback, and a sense of community.
  5. You will learn to start and finish a project.

Practical tips:

  1. Do small, flat pieces that store easily.
  2. Make with the supplies you have on hand.
  3. Set up a place to do your art or a way to take it with you.
  4. Set aside time every day.
  5. Don’t worry if it’s not perfect.

Here are some challenges you can find on the internet (click on the links to find them):

Creativebug 30-day challenges

Creative Every Day

National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)

Drawing Challenge

And here are some interesting books I’ve found:

Make Art Every Day: A Weekly Planner for Creative Thinkers

Wake Up Your Imagination: A Journal for Creative Play

Draw Every Day, Every Way

#5 Jennifer Love Gironda — Prolific Artist and High School Art Teacher

Jennifer Love Gironda is a high school art teacher in Lake Worth, Florida. Her loves are textiles and beads, and she often combines the two. She has a habit of producing a piece of art a day (and she is on her 7th year!), and she publishes them on her blog and instagram. 

Listen here or download from any podcast app.

Jennifer attended the Hermitage Artist Retreat in Florida for a month in 2017. Here she is with a quilt that she is beading.

At the Hermitage, she also made these delicate paper cuts. She mounted them in a room divider which remains at the Hermitage for all to enjoy.

 

Here is Jenny on her trip to Japan. Left to right: She is with school children in Hiroshima; at a tea ceremony; and in Tokyo.

Jenny has exhibited many of her art-a-day pieces. This first one is from her GirlTalk series, which was shown at the PBCATA show at Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery in Lake Worth, Florida. The next photo is from her Disney series, at her show in North Carolina.

Jenny is always looking for a way to incorporate jewelry making into her art. She made this piece using a few of her art-a-day artwork.

Here are some of the things we discussed on this episode (click on the names to follow the links):

Jennifer Love Gironda has a website that shows every piece of artwork she’s made per day for over 6 years. Check out the blog section of her website at jenniferlovegironda.com.

You can also find her daily artwork on Instagram: artinw_damuse.

If you’re interested in applying for a retreat, see the Hermitage Artist Retreat.

Jenny holds a fashion summer camp at The Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach, Florida.

She is a member of the Palm Beach County Art Teachers Association (PBCATA).

She has exhibited at Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery in Lake Worth, Florida.

Her artwork a day is always based on monthly themes. Here are a few themes we discussed. If you click on them, it will take you to that section of her website:

Wedding Dresses

Mythical May

November Blue

GirlTalk: Influential Women and Black History Month

And finally, here are a few more takeaways from my conversation with Jennifer Love Gironda:

  1. When you move to a new city, take some time to check out the local art galleries, organizations, and public art.
  2. Search for an apply for artist retreats or residencies.
  3. Work to develop your style as an artist by creating one piece of art a day.
  4. Make a series of artwork based on a theme. This will improve your techniques and challenge you creatively.
  5. Don’t be afraid to call yourself an artist!

Give yourself a treat, and take some time to look through Jennifer’s website or Instagram. Allow an hour or two or many! I guarantee you will be inspired by all that she creates.

#4 Approaching Galleries: How to Find Them, How to Talk to Them

On the Left Brain Artist podcast, I will bring you weekly interviews with artists who are actively creating art and actively selling their art. Of course, I’ve chosen these artists because of the quality of their artwork. But I’ve also chosen them because they have experience showing their work in galleries, stores, festivals, and they have stories to share that can help other artists who want to sell their work. Each week I will bring you an interview with one of these artists. Later in the week, I’ll take one thing we discussed that I think it’s important to expand upon – one thing that they’ve done to increase their business. They’ve had success doing this one thing, and I want to share that success with you.

Listen here or download from any podcast app.

When I spoke with ceramic artist Barbara Powell, she talked about how she approaches galleries about showing her work. Here are the takeaways:

1. Visit the space to see if your artwork is the right fit.

2. Talk with other artists who have exhibited there.

3. Attend an artist reception at the gallery.

4. Practice saying what it is you do.

5. Make an initial contact with the gallery owner.

6. Email the gallery owner, and include high quality photographs of your work.

7. Sign an agreement to display your work at that gallery.

8. Include an inventory of your artwork that will be displayed at the gallery.

Thanks for listening! I hope you learned something good today.

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